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Health & Safety
Feb 24, 2016
SAFETY & HEALTH COMMITTEE In the last six months, the number of safety incidents and near misses in our Local has steadily increased. This has forced our hand as a Local into more decisive action. The Safety and Health Committee has typically been more of a passive committee, working in the background, laying necessary groundwork, and acting when needed.
Feb 16, 2016
SAFETY & HEALTH COMMITTEE In the last six months, the number of safety incidents and near misses in our Local has steadily increased. This has forced our hand as a Local into more decisive action. The Safety and Health Committee has typically been more of a passive committee, working in the background, laying necessary groundwork, and acting when needed.
Aug 06, 2013

Jul 19, 2011

 

Preventing Heat Stress, Exhaustion, & Stroke

 

When the body is unable to cool itself by sweating, several heat-induced illnesses such as heat stress or heat exhaustion and the more severe heat stroke can occur, and can result in death. With many of our Outside Plant and Construction Techs being exposed to record breaking temperatures of heat across the nation, we urge all of our Members to take the proper precautions for their health and safety. The following are the symptoms and procedures for dealing with heat stress as recommended by OSHA.

 

Factors Leading to Heat Stress

 High temperature and humidity; direct sun or heat; limited air movement; physical exertion; poor physical condition; some medicines; and inadequate tolerance for hot workplaces.

 
Symptoms of Heat Exhaustion

  • Headaches, dizziness, lightheadedness or fainting.
  • Weakness and moist skin.
  • Mood changes such as irritability or confusion.
  • Upset stomach or vomiting.

Symptoms of Heat Stroke

  • Dry, hot skin with no sweating.
  • Mental confusion or losing consciousness.
  • Seizures or convulsions.

Preventing Heat Stress

  • Know signs/symptoms of heat-related illnesses; monitor yourself and coworkers.
  • Block out direct sun or other heat sources.
  • Use cooling fans/air-conditioning; rest regularly.
  • Drink lots of water; about 1 cup every 15 minutes.
  • Wear lightweight, light colored, loose-fitting clothes.
  • Avoid alcohol, caffeinated drinks, or heavy meals.

What to Do for Heat-Related Illness

  • Call 911 (or local emergency number) at once.

While waiting for help to arrive:

  • Move the worker to a cool, shaded area.
  • Loosen or remove heavy clothing.
  • Provide cool drinking water.
  • Fan and mist the person with water.

Sep 08, 2009

Jan 22, 2009

Apr 07, 2008
KNOW YOUR RIGHTS   SOME DO'S AND DON'T'S     DO provide them with your social security number. DO provide them with the names and telephone numbers of your supervisor. DO tell them that you are ill. DO ask the person you're speaking with their full name and title
Jan 29, 2009

RECOGNIZING A STROKE

 

Thank God for the sense to remember the '3' steps, STR . Read and Learn!

 

Sometimes symptoms of a stroke are difficult to identify. Unfortunately, the lack of awareness spells disaster. The stroke victim may suffer severe brain damage when people nearby fail to recognize the symptoms of a stroke.

 

Now doctors say a bystander can recognize a stroke by asking three simple questions:

 

S *Ask the individual to SMILE.

T *Ask the person to TALK and SPEAK A SIMPLE SENTENCE (Coherently)

(i.e. It is sunny out today)

R *Ask him or her to RAISE BOTH ARMS.

 

If he or she has trouble with ANY ONE of these tasks, call emergency number immediately and describe the symptoms to the dispatcher.

 

New Sign of a Stroke -------- Stick out Your Tongue

 

NOTE: Another 'sign' of a stroke is this: Ask the person to 'stick' out his tongue.. If the tongue is 'crooked', if it goes to one side or the other, that is also an indication of a stroke.

 




Page Last Updated: Feb 24, 2016 (19:33:06)
 
 
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